Columns | Tarpaulin Sky Magazine

PEOPLE THINKING THOUGHTS ON THINGS SINCE 2003 | IMAGE: NOAH SATERSTROM

Columns | Tarpaulin Sky Magazine

PEOPLE THINKING THOUGHTS ON THINGS SINCE 2003 | IMAGE: NOAH SATERSTROM

“Original Obsessions”: Interview with Steven Dunn

Original Obsessions seeks to discover the origins of writerly curiosity -- the gestation and development of these imaginings -- focusing on early fixations that burrowed into an author's psyche and that reappear in their current book. In this installment, Julia Cohen and Abby Hagler interview Steven Dunn, author of Water and Power

Kelly Krumrie’s “figuring”: On Fractals, Part 2

"How can literature be fractal? It should probably include repetitions on various scales. But what are the edges of literary repetition? What can be counted? How can what’s counted get bigger or smaller while remaining the same?" - Kelly Krumrie

Kelly Krumrie’s “figuring”: On Fractals, Part 1

"I am fascinated by the rendering of geometric constructions in language, the Euclidean inquiry into what is a line and how can I both draw and describe it, and with what tools… How this writing is similar to and different from poetry, for example. How the directions above make something by doing the same thing over and over." --- Kelly Krumrie

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“Original Obsessions”: Interview with Steven Dunn

Original Obsessions seeks to discover the origins of writerly curiosity -- the gestation and development of these imaginings -- focusing on early fixations that burrowed into an author's psyche and that reappear in their current book. In this installment, Julia Cohen and Abby Hagler interview Steven Dunn, author of Water and Power

Kelly Krumrie’s “figuring”: On Fractals, Part 2

"How can literature be fractal? It should probably include repetitions on various scales. But what are the edges of literary repetition? What can be counted? How can what’s counted get bigger or smaller while remaining the same?" - Kelly Krumrie

Kelly Krumrie’s “figuring”: On Fractals, Part 1

"I am fascinated by the rendering of geometric constructions in language, the Euclidean inquiry into what is a line and how can I both draw and describe it, and with what tools… How this writing is similar to and different from poetry, for example. How the directions above make something by doing the same thing over and over." --- Kelly Krumrie

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