Columns | Tarpaulin Sky Magazine

PEOPLE THINKING THOUGHTS ON THINGS SINCE 2003 | IMAGE: NOAH SATERSTROM

Columns | Tarpaulin Sky Magazine

PEOPLE THINKING THOUGHTS ON THINGS SINCE 2003 | IMAGE: NOAH SATERSTROM

James Pate’s Evening Signals: Germán Sierra’s “The Artifact”

"Here, fiction is never used to illustrate theory. Rather, the concepts are expressed in language so particular, and in circumstances that create such specific moods and ambiences, that to try to extract the theory from the fiction leads to a reductive misreading of the text. " - James Pate

“Original Obsessions”: Interview with Steven Dunn

Original Obsessions seeks to discover the origins of writerly curiosity -- the gestation and development of these imaginings -- focusing on early fixations that burrowed into an author's psyche and that reappear in their current book. In this installment, Julia Cohen and Abby Hagler interview Steven Dunn, author of Water and Power

Kelly Krumrie’s “figuring”: On Fractals, Part 2

"How can literature be fractal? It should probably include repetitions on various scales. But what are the edges of literary repetition? What can be counted? How can what’s counted get bigger or smaller while remaining the same?" - Kelly Krumrie

Load More Posts

James Pate’s Evening Signals: Germán Sierra’s “The Artifact”

"Here, fiction is never used to illustrate theory. Rather, the concepts are expressed in language so particular, and in circumstances that create such specific moods and ambiences, that to try to extract the theory from the fiction leads to a reductive misreading of the text. " - James Pate

“Original Obsessions”: Interview with Steven Dunn

Original Obsessions seeks to discover the origins of writerly curiosity -- the gestation and development of these imaginings -- focusing on early fixations that burrowed into an author's psyche and that reappear in their current book. In this installment, Julia Cohen and Abby Hagler interview Steven Dunn, author of Water and Power

Kelly Krumrie’s “figuring”: On Fractals, Part 2

"How can literature be fractal? It should probably include repetitions on various scales. But what are the edges of literary repetition? What can be counted? How can what’s counted get bigger or smaller while remaining the same?" - Kelly Krumrie